Skip links and keyboard navigation

Health alert: COVID-19

Visitors are currently welcome at our facilities. Please refer to visitor restrictions for more information. Read more about COVID-19 testingvaccination, our COVID-19 response and the latest Queensland Government information.

Don’t touch bats

4 August 2022

The Metro South Public Health Unit (MSPHU) is reminding the public not to approach, touch or handle distressed or dead bats following recent reports of injuries caused by bats.

Metro South Public Health Physician Dr Bhakti Vasant said bats, microbats and flying foxes may carry bacteria and viruses that could be harmful to humans, including the Australian Bat Lyssavirus (ABLV).

“Bats don’t normally approach humans. When people try to move a bat that appears to be dead or injured, that’s when they are most likely to be scratched or bitten,” she said.

“Scratches and bites from a bat as well as bat saliva in your eyes, nose or mouth, are very serious and require immediate first aid and medical assessment.

“Please leave bat rescues to trained carers and wildlife professionals, who are vaccinated against rabies and have the right protective equipment.

“If you come across an injured or sick bat, don’t touch it and contact the RSPCA on 1300 ANIMAL (1300 264 625).”

Dr Vasant said it was also important parents teach their children to never approach or touch bats, and to notify a trusted adult immediately if they came into contact with a bat.

“The public should call 13 HEALTH (13 432 584) or visit a doctor immediately regarding any possible exposure,” she said.

“Prompt treatment following a bat scratch or bite can prevent serious disease and possibly death. But the best way to protect yourself and your family is to simply not touch or approach bats.”

Last updated 4 August 2022
Last reviewed 4 August 2022

Other news

interprofessional recognition team award 2022 PHU MSOH

The partnership that stood the test of time to win the Interprofessional recognition award

A chance meeting in March 2020 between the Metro South Public Health Unit (MSPHU) and Metro South Oral Health (MSOH) to discuss office space and the expansion of MSPHU to respond to COVID-19 led to an interprofessional collaboration that has spanned two years and contributed to the success of the COVID-19 contact tracing team in Metro South Health.